Overton County – Vintage Tour

The rich history of Overton County makes this day trip one you'll want to prep for to make sure you fit it all in!

A GUIDE TO EXPLORING THE CUMBERLAND RIVER BASIN

Obey and Cordell Hull watershed
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From Civil War and music history, to local change makers with a passion for rural education and opportunity, learn the history that makes Livingston and Overton County what it is today.

Wired Coffee
Wired Coffee
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Wired Coffee

1185 Preston St, Livingston, TN 38570

Wake up your curiosity with one of many delightful coffee drinks and an array of offerings, such as flavored lattes, frappes, cold brew, and hot chocolate.
 
 

 

Overton County Heritage Museum
Overton Heritage Museum
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Overton County Heritage Museum

318 W Broad St, Livingston, TN 38570

Any history buff will be pleased with the variety offered at the Overton County Heritage Museum in Livingston. There you’ll learn about Moses Fisk, the pioneer educator who established the first female academy south of the Ohio River. And A.H. Roberts, the Tennessee Governor from Alpine who played a pivotal role in the history of women’s suffrage.
 
The museum also showcases Overton County’s diverse musical heritage. An accomplished musician and instrument maker, Homer Ledford played thirteen different musical instruments and shared the stage with the likes of Bill Monroe. Blues legend Roy Roberts grew up in Livingston and went on to perform with Solomon Burke, Stevie Wonder and Otis Redding. He later donated a guitar to his hometown museum. But if Overton County’s musical past is impressive, its future looks even brighter if you travel out to Jack and Lynne Stoddart’s farm a couple of weekends every year, you’ll discover why Overton County is the national “Home of Americana Music.”
 
With the success of the Jammin’ at Hippie Jacks series on WCTE PBS and throughout the nation, Hippie Jack decided he needed a full blown festival to highlight the music. Every Memorial Day weekend and in late September, people flock to Hippie Jacks’ farm to experience Americana Roots Music. This music is an important expression of American culture and includes bluegrass, blues, gospel, Cajun, country, folk, rock and acoustic jam. But it’s not just world-class musical talent on the stage—folks camp out, play in the creek, enjoy the countryside and always make new friends. Musicians and music lovers come from all over the country to Overton County to celebrate Americana music, life and each other!
 
 

The Vintage Shops of Livingston
Vintage Tour of Livinston
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Downtown Livingston

The Antique Market

Specializing in costume and estate jewelry, primitive furniture, quilts, and more, The Antique Market has been in business for 22 years. They have over 40 booths with great items ranging from designer jewelry to primitive antiques. Their dealers are from all over the south and strive to bring in “one of a kind” pieces. New merchandise arrives daily.

The Emporium

Explore antiques, local arts and crafts, repurposed and painted furniture, and clothing for your whole family, including your pets!

The Picker’s Palace 1 & 2

Local artisans and crafters set up in booths in both locations and feature antiques, clothing, décor, homemade pet food, and more!

Cora’s

Featuring furniture, arts, crafts, and collectibles, Cora’s is a popular spot for finding the perfect addition to your home décor.

1806 General Store

A cornerstone of downtown Livingston and named after the year Overton County was founded, 1806 General Store is part museum, part antique store, and part restaurant. Enjoy browsing or finding your next steal from the antiques on display from over 40 high-quality vendors. And take in the décor and photographs depicting the unique history of Overton County.

Courthouse Burning in Livingston

Learn about the Confederate Guerillas’ motive when they burned down the county courthouse in 1865.

Civil War Markers / Bethlehem Church
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Civil War Markers / Bethlehem Church

Highway 84 Livingston, TN 38570

Discover Overton County’s rich Civil War history by visiting the local Civil War markers. The markers provide stories of secession debates among citizens, training camps, and the burning of the Livingston courthouse by a company of Confederate Guerillas. At Bethlehem Church, a local school teacher spoke out against local secessionists in the name of free speech… but not without consequences.

Zollicoffer Training Camp
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Zollicoffer Training Camp

714 Hillham Highway Livingston, TN 38570

Visit the site of the training camp for the 28th Tennessee Infantry Regiment.

Myers Training Camp
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Myers Training Camp

3416 Byrdstown highway Monroe, TN 38570

Camp Myers served as both a Confederate Training Camp and a permanent post on watch for raids from Kentucky.

Alpine Institute
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Alpine Institute

126 Campus Cir, Alpine, TN 38543

John Dillard established the Alpine Institute in 1821 as a Presbyterian mission school, to provide exceptional education to students in the Upper Cumberland hill country. The school was burned during the Civil War and again by the Ku Klux Klan during Reconstruction. The school and gymnasium were built back in the native stone. In 1880, A.H. Roberts, the future Governor of Tennessee, expanded the school for primary, intermediate, and collegiate courses. Although the original school structure no longer exists, several contributing structures were included in the National Register of Historic Places in 2002.

Cabin on the Mountain
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Cabin on the Mountain

Livingston, TN 38570

Now it’s time to retreat and relax in a cozy private cabin. Located just 3 miles outside of Livingston, this super host will make sure you have all you need for a restful night’s sleep.
 
 

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